Roses and Rosemary

Roses, rosemary and lots of trees thrive in the old cemetery in North Dunedin, New Zealand. Its a very pleasant and interesting place to visit and has an appealing informal, rustic, Olde World feel. The photos are displayed in the same order in which I took them so I hope you enjoy this little exploration.

rsz_dun_nth_cemetery_01Photo above: In memory of  John Griffiths
Late Captain S.S. Taranaki
Born Pwllheli, Carnarvon, North Wales
Died 18 August 1877
Aged 58 Years


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btyPhoto (above) taken by Nigel

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These last two photos show rampant rosemary bursting out of its confines!

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Text and photos by Exploring Colour (2017) unless otherwise attributed

 

 

 

25 thoughts on “Roses and Rosemary

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  1. Your photos are lovely! The roses are beautiful and I have never seen rosemary grow like this, fascinating. Old cemeteries are so filled with history that most times is lost to us. I used to spend time at one that was off a frequented walking path, just reading the headstones. I always wondered what story was hidden beneath them, especially the children. Thank-you for this delightful post!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Old cemeteries are so full of character, and some headstones tell a great story. The fallen stones show that the caretakers of these long buried people are probably long since gone as well.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The headstone at the top of this post was “Erected by a few friends”, and the headstone in yesterday’s post was erected by the officers and staff of the institution in which the deceased had worked, so its possible that there wouldn’t have been anyone with close ties to tend to their grave-sites on an ongoing basis. (In the 1870s, 1880s I imagine this may have been quite common).

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      1. It is quite an interesting subject. They say in England, many councils are running out of burial plots. I’m interested in having a green/eco burial when my own time comes, but hopefully that’s still a way off!

        Liked by 1 person

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