Libertia Berries

I was amazed to find this profusion of glorious golden yellow Libertia berries in the native collection at Dunedin Botanic Garden on 29 April 2021 (autumn in New Zealand). I’d say these are Libertia ixioides. Click on any photo to enlarge.


Beautiful native lancewood tree in among the berries.

Two lancewoods that look like they’re wading through the berries!
~ or twirling 🙂


Text and photos by Liz; Exploring Colour (2021)

7 thoughts on “Libertia Berries

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  1. I’m always glad to learn about another native plant down there. I wondered whether the genus name had anything to do with liberty but found in Wikipedia that “the genus was named after the Belgian botanist Marie-Anne Libert (1782–1865) (also referred to as Anne-Marie Libert).”

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    1. Thank you Steve, I find it charming that this lovely genus is named for a female botanist. When she died in 1865 it was the goldmining era in NZ, which fits with the golden yellow berries! Marie-Anne seems an unusual form of that particular hyphenated name, Anne-Marie flows off my tongue more easily 🙂

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  2. A friend gave me a libertia plant a little while ago but I don’t know if it’s at all similar. It has had a few white flowers so far, so I will look out for berries in the future. The lancewoods look like little fireworks rocketing up through the libertia. 🙂

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      1. Thanks for the link! From that, I would think my plant is most likely to be ‘Formosa Group, since it’s the most commonly grown. I hope mine goes on to have as many flowers as in the picture!

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