The Lyrebird (Australia)

The colours, flowers, wildlife and landscapes of Australia draw me like a magnet. Through Twitter I found nature photos taken by Carol Probets and requested permission to share her lyrebird photo here on my blog.

From Carol’s tweets I learned that the name lyrebird comes from the tail’s similarity to a lyre, an ancient type of harp. I also learned that they’re most famous for their incredible vocal mimicry. Home for Carol is the Blue Mountains, 100 km west of Sydney.

“To think like a scientist and wonder like a child.” –on Carol’s about page (blog)


Mid-winter is peak lyrebird time with the males singing for hours each day. I managed to snap this male displaying in the treetops yesterday afternoon and it turned a crap day into a good one. — Carol Probets, tweet 18 June 2019

Click on the photo to enlarge

IMG_0728“Superb Lyrebird”

Carol Probets is active on Twitter:  @carolprobets |  twitter url link


Carol has interesting posts at her WP blog  Lyreades

— if you’d like a starter, this post is full of colourful flowers:

Some wildflowers of Western Australia  |  07 Nov 2016

— and this has amazing photos of “waterfalls” of mist flowing down a cliff face

Katoomba’s Phantom Falls  |  photos taken 06 Aug 2016, Blue Mountains

She’s also contributed a story to The Royal Botanic Garden Sydney website:

Winter birding in the Blue Mountains  |   06 May 2019


Posted by Liz; Exploring Colour (2019). Photo by Carol Probets

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18 thoughts on “The Lyrebird (Australia)

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  1. Benjamin was so enthralled by Carol Probets marvelous photo of the Superb Lyrebird that he wanted to search for more information about them. By “Googling” we came upon one from National Geographic that had an audio-video that was fascinating. I had to laugh when he said : “Gem, I wish there was a Lyrebird in your backyard!” I must admit that it would definitely be a wonderful addition. Benjamin also wants me to say : “Thank you for sharing Ms. Liz, this bird is so awesome!” We also visited “Lyreades”, loved what we found and became followers too. Thank-YOU x 2!!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi Ellen and Benjamin, I’m so glad you found the lyrebird interesting – they are truly fascinating and beautiful birds. Some people who live next to the bush in my part of Australia do get lyrebirds visiting their backyards, and sometimes even get annoyed with them as they dig up small plants. Lyrebirds rake through a huge amount of soil each day with their powerful feet in search of worms and grubs. If that was me I’d be so pleased to have lyrebirds I wouldn’t care about a few little plants being uprooted! 😂 Thanks also for checking in at my blog Lyreades. There will be some new posts soon, including one about some very unusual lyrebirds.
      Cheers, Carol

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Tracy, thanks for your general post advising that your comments are going to spam. I went and checked and sure enough I found your comment sitting there. It must be very frustrating for you, and its hard to understand how this can even happen given that you’ve left comments here before. Such a shame that your comment didn’t appear immediately but thank you for expressing your appreciation. I did notice your ‘like’ and I wondered what you’d thought. Are there wild lyrebirds near where you live?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I just loved the shape and form of that lyrebird tail. They are quite rare in our region and I have never seen them here. I have seen a couple down the south coast pre my photography days. Good excuse for a coastal holiday I think. 🙂

        The comment issue is frustrating because I never know when it is going to occur. It is so random. Ugh.

        Liked by 2 people

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