Propagation Facility: Odd Plants

While wandering around the Propagation Facility at Dunedin Botanic Garden on Sunday I came across some quite odd-looking plants. I’ll share a few of them with you…

rsz_dbot_prophouse_Q01

Above photo: Rhipsalis teres. It is an epiphytic cacti from South America. This info kindly provided to me by the Propagation Services Officer via email.


rsz_dbot_prophouse_sundew_Q01

above and below: sundew-type plants

rsz_dbot_prophouse_sundew_Q02


rsz_dbot_prophouse_cyperus_papyrus_Q01

above and below: I’m assuming these are Cyperus papyrus or Papyrus

rsz_dbot_prophouse_cyperus_papyrus_Q02


Pitcher Plants

rsz_dbot_prophouse_pitcher_01

rsz_dbot_prophouse_pitcher_02

rsz_dbot_prophouse_yellow_pitcher_01

rsz_dbot_prophouse_yellow_pitcher_02


Wollemi Pine or Wollemia nobilis, only known through fossil records until it was discovered in 1994 near Sydney, Australia…

rsz_dbot_prophouse_wollemi_02

rsz_dbot_prophouse_wollemi_01


A rather prickly looking aloe…

rsz_dbot_prophouse_aloe_01

rsz_dbot_prophouse_aloe_02


And some strangely lippy-looking leaves…

rsz_dbot_prophouse_lippy_leaves_01Haemanthus coccineus (has red flowers). The small leaved plant in the photo next to the Haemanthus coccineus is Veltheimia bracteata. This information kindly provided via email by the Propagation Services Officer from Dunedin Botanic Garden.

rsz_dbot_prophouse_lippy_leaves_02Haemanthus coccineus


Text and photos by Exploring Colour (2017)

5 thoughts on “Propagation Facility: Odd Plants

Add yours

    1. Thank you for noticing that Pete! You’ve latched onto my favourite! They are beautiful and I’m thinking of posting one of them as a full-image post. I was surprised they turned out as well as they did!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for your question, Helen. The Propagation Services Officer has advised as follows: “The large leaf one is Haemanthus coccineus, has red flowers, Haemanthus albiflos, the shaving brush plant, has smaller leaves and shorter white flowers. The small leaved plant in the photo next to the Haemanthus coccineus is Veltheimia bracteata”

      Liked by 1 person

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